Classic Broadway Musical Hit ‘Damn Yankees’ Sees Pagosa Springs Revival

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The classic musical comedy “Damn Yankees” — book by George Abbott and Douglass Wallop, music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross — opened on Broadway in 1955 and ran for 1,019 performances in its original production. It’s a modern retelling of the Faust legend set during the 1950s in Washington, D.C. — home of the hapless Washington Senators baseball team — during a time when the New York Yankees dominated Major League Baseball.

Middle-aged real estate agent Joe Boyd is a long-suffering fan of the pathetic Washington Senators. His wife Meg laments her husband’s hopeless dedication to a losing baseball team… while Joe grumbles that if only the Senators just had a long ball hitter, they could beat the “damn Yankees.”

“I’d sell my soul for a long ball hitter,” he laments… at which point “Mr. Applegate” appears, seemingly out of thin air. He looks like a slick salesman, but he is really the Devil, and he offers Joe exactly the deal requested: if he gives up his soul, Joe will become “Joe Hardy,” the young slugger the Senators need.

Joe accepts, but his business sense makes him insist on an escape clause. The Senators’ last game is on September 25, and if Joe plays in that final game, he is “in for the duration.” If not, he has until 9 o’clock the night before the final game to walk away from the deal and return to his normal life… But what Joe doesn’t foresee is the appearance of Lola, brought into the arrangement by “Mr. Applegate” to seduce Joe and insure his eternal damnation…

Based on the novel The Year The Yankees Lost The Pennant by Douglass Wallop. Direction and choreography by Ryan Hazelbaker. ‘Damn Yankees’ is presented through an exclusive arrangement with MTI

DATES: July 15, 18, 19, 25, 31; August 1, 5, 9, 14, 15, 20, 22.
TICKETS:
$30 Adult; $13- Child (Add $10 for Opening Night)

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